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The prestigious international fashion magazine Elle has pledged to end the promotion of animal fur in its editorial and advertising content. Founded in France in 1945, Elle is one of the world’s largest fashion and lifestyle publications (21 million readers per month, 6.6 million copies sold per month, and 175 million total reach), so this decision will send a strong message to the fashion industry about the need to ditch fur once and for all.

The animal welfare organisations the Humane Society of the United States, Humane Society International, and the fashion industry’s reform group Creatives4Change wrote a charter aimed to stop promoting fur in fashion, now signed by Elle’s 45 global editions.

This charter bans editorial content that promotes animal fur on its pages, websites and social media, including no animal fur in editorials, press images, runway and street style images. Also, it no longer allows the depiction of animal fur in any advertisements on its pages or online.

Valeria Bessolo LLopiz, Elle’s international director, said: “The presence of animal fur in our pages and on our digital media is no longer in line with our values, nor our readers’. It is time for ELLE to make a statement on this matter, a statement that reflects our attention to the critical issues of protecting and caring for the environment and animals, rejecting animal cruelty.”

Alexi Lubomirski, founder of Creatives for Change, said: “Since its inception, ELLE magazine has always been a leading light in fashion, synonymous with a freshness, unencumbered by the weight of tradition and formality. Because of this strength, ELLE was said to ‘not so much reflect fashion as decree it.’ It is this creative power to inspire, that allows ELLE to make broad steps in shaping the hearts and minds of its readers for a more evolved and aware future for all.”

British Vogue, Cosmopolitan UK, InStyle USA, and Vogue Scandinavia’s have already pledged to reject fur in their editorial content, although not yet in their advertising policies. 

The campaign to abolish the fur industry is advancing on multiple fronts: the reduction of demand by fewer people buying and wearing fur, the development of alternatives, the banning of fur farms around the world, the banning of fur sales, the banning of the import of fur, the ditching of fur by major fashion brands and designers, and now stopping the promotion of fur products. We are gradually winning.